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Black Lives Matter Worship Collection

Recognizing that white supremacy is an institutionalized cultural pattern reaching far beyond any single incident or person, WorshipWeb offers this collection of #BlackLivesMatter worship resources. 

Black Lives Matter (or #BlackLivesMatter) is a movement and a stance in response to this reality: the United States was built on a legacy of slavery, racism, and oppression that continues to take new, ever-changing forms. As this quote illustrates, to say that "black lives matter" doesn't mean that black lives are more important than other lives, or that all lives don't matter. The systemic devaluing of Black lives calls us to bear witness, even as we acknowledge that oppression takes many intersecting forms. 

Reflections by Black Authors

Braver/Wiser Reflections by Black Authors

Other Worship Resources

Sermons

These sermons are aimed primarily at white listeners/readers:

Share your original #BlackLivesMatter worship resources with WorshipWeb. 

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A black man in a "Black Lives Matter" T-shirt uses a megaphone to stir a crowd at a rally
clergy wearing stoles walk arm in arm in the street
A black man, smiling into the camera, holds a toddler with his hand on the man's cheek.

Decentering Whiteness in Worship

From WorshipWeb

What Are These Webinars About? In these three videos, Unitarian Universalist religious professionals of color discuss how UU worship leaders can decenter whiteness, take apart models and habits that uphold white supremacy culture, and find new ways to create worship. The newest webinar, "Beyond...

Decentering Whiteness in Worship

Maj. Angel Mesa, a U.S. Army Africa operations officer, bows his head in deep thought during a prayer at the North African American Cemetery and Memorial in Tunisia
A young copule sits on a sidewalk, pressed together, laughing.
UUs holding Black Lives Matter banner witness for racial justice in Denver, CO, January 2015.

The Fire This Time A New Generation Speaks about Race

By Jesmyn Ward

From inSpirit: The UU Book and Gift Shop

Envisioned as a response to The Fire Next Time, James Baldwin's groundbreaking 1963 essay collection, contemporary writers reflect on the past, present, and future of race in America.

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The New Jim Crow Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

By Michelle Alexander

From inSpirit: The UU Book and Gift Shop

The 2012-2013 UUA Common Read.

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