Indigenous American

This list includes every page tagged with "Indigenous American."

  • By Byron "Tyler" Coles
    From WorshipWeb
    Deep in the shadow of night, down near the crossroads and cemetery gates, with bitter liquor and cigar smoke wafting, I greet you. ...
  • By Byron "Tyler" Coles
    From WorshipWeb
    Deep in the shadow of night, down near the crossroads and cemetery gates, with bitter liquor and cigar smoke wafting, I greet you. ...
  • By Susan Frederick-Gray
    From UU World
    A message to white Unitarian Universalists
  • By Dina Gilio-Whitaker
    From UU World

    The American environmental movement is rooted historically in ideas about pristine wilderness, free from human presence, that replicate colonial patterns of white supremacy and settler privilege. Native-led movements are changing the script.

  • By Elaine McArdle
    From UU World

    Rooted in partnerships formed at the Oceti Sakowin Camp, UU Ministry for Earth helps host InterNātional Grass Roots Gathering in August.

  • By Staff Writer
    From UU World

    Discussion guide available for ‘An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States.’

  • By Myke Johnson
    From WorshipWeb
    Don’t try to steal someone else’s culture. Do your own spiritual work. Research the stories of your ancestors. Trace the journeys that brought them to the land where you now reside. Learn the stories of their brokenness and their connections.
  • By Daniel Gregoire
    From Braver/Wiser
    Something new could come out of this moment of discomfort; something like healing. This is our opportunity to reimagine what Thanksgiving could be — and who we could be.
  • By Isabel Call
    From WorshipWeb
    We celebrate Thanksgiving because gratitude is essential to human life. But grief is essential for healing our history of violence. The 400-year-old story we've heard about harmony between people of different backgrounds just isn't true.
  • By Myke Johnson
    From WorshipWeb
    In 1617, a few years before English settlers landed, an epidemic began to spread through the area that became southern New England. By 1620, ninety to ninety-six percent of the population had died.