Writing for the Web

Image of a person typing at a computer

You have one chance to make a first impression—on every page of your website. Be sure your content:

  • Supports your mission.
  • Helps your users find what they need.
  • Encourages web visitors to become congregational visitors.

An accessible website doesn't exclude visitors due to their abilities or the method they choose to access the web.

Tips

People don't read webpages, they scan. Therefore:

  • Put the most important ideas first. Don't start with "happy talk," greetings, and introductions. Get to the point. Consider the F-pattern—people typically scan a page across the top and down the left.
  • Cover one idea per paragraph. Words that are bold, italicized, or linked will jump out when scanned, so use that to your advantage—but don't overdo it: bolding and linking large chunks of text reduces reading comprehension.
  • Use action words and omit fluff. Edit until every word counts.
  • Use bulleted and numbered lists. They are easier to scan than blocks of text.
  • Use headings to separate the page into topical sections. The reader can scan down to the section of interest.