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UUs in the Military – Conscience in a Hard Place
UUs in the Military – Conscience in a Hard Place

Ending War – Honoring the Principled Warrior

The relationship of Unitarian Universalism (UU) and the Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) to the military is complex and as lengthy as the history of the United States. While the UUA and Unitarian Universalism is generally pacifist, UUs have  and do serve in the military. The UUA has supported wars in the past. On  Memorial Day we remember UUs in uniform who perished, and honor UUs present and past for their contribution by bringing UU Principles and Sources to bear in one of the least humane theaters on earth – that of armed conflict, potential or engaged.

Learn About the UUA and the Military – Watch this module from the soon to be released Unitarian Universalist Military Ministry curriculum: https://uuacdn.s3.amazonaws.com/videos/military-ministry-excerpt-cynthia-kane.mp4 Read this excellent history of the evolving relationship between of UUs and the UUA to the military, "Embattled Faith", by Neil Shister from the Summer 2003 edition of UU World Magazine. Read "Unitarian Universalists in the Military", presented at the 2005 UUA General Assembly. Read "Once a Rarity, UU Military Chaplains Increasing", by Don Skinner in the Spring 2013 edition of UU World Magazine Visit the Church of the Larger Fellowship (CLF) Unitarian Universalist Military Ministry (UUMM) including information and resources for GLBTQAI and the Military, overseas deployed military and returning military. From Skinner House Books

Bless All Who Serve – (A pocket-sized and durable little book of readings and songs from many faith traditions, ancient and modern, plus reflections by veterans and military chaplains. Speaks to themes of commitment, courage, patriotism, freedom, strength and service. Reflection topics include fear of injury and death, grief, peace and violence, hope and despair, separation from loved ones and honoring the fallen.)

   

War Zone Faith  – (Army chaplain and UU minister George Tyger has seen and experienced things that many of us cannot fathom on his deployment to Afghanistan : naked children throwing rocks at him in the street, a playground in the middle of a Taliban graveyard, and incredible violence, anger, loneliness, and fear. Tyger reflects on his faith, prejudices, and his privilege, and shares the unique perspective gained while serving and ministering in a war zone.)

 

About the Author

  • Ted joined the staff of the Office of Youth and Young Adult Ministries in February 2010. He brings more than twenty-five years of experience using media to create social change by creating communications strategies and content for progressive non-profits, political campaigns, and cause based...

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