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Activity 3: Honoring Inner Strength

Activity 3: Honoring Inner Strength
Activity 3: Honoring Inner Strength

Activity time: 25 minutes

Tell participants that you are going to lead a ceremony, and will begin with two quotes from Neil deGrasse Tyson, an astrophysicist and director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History:

We are all connected; To each other, biologically. To the earth, chemically. To the rest of the universe, atomically.

The problem, often not discovered until late in life, is that when you look for things in life like love, meaning, motivation, it implies they are sitting behind a tree or under a rock. The most successful people in life recognize, that in life they create their own love, they manufacture their own meaning, they generate their own motivation. For me, I am driven by two main philosophies, know more today about the world than I knew yesterday. And lessen the suffering of others. You'd be surprised how far that gets you.

Say:

We have been talking about the strength we gain from reviewing and dealing with our past experiences, connections, and learnings. Of your strengths, which one comes to mind as most meaningful for you?

Invite every participant to share one personal inner strength. Explain the ritual, as follows:

One at a time, when you are ready, you will come to the chalice.

State, loudly and with pride, “I am… [name]. My inner strength is…”

After you speak, l will ring the chime or bell, and say, "So be it.”

Other participants will be silent for a time to honor your inner strength. During the silence, you will choose a river stone from the chalice cloth.

Then we will all cheer as you return to your place!

After all have claimed their inner strength, lead one more round of cheers. Hand out the Hindsight, Humor, and Hope achievement certificates.

For more information contact religiouseducation@uua.org.

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