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Singing Out for Love's Return
Singing Out for Love's Return

"The soul is made of love and must ever strive to return to love. Therefore, it can never find rest nor happiness in other things. It must lose itself in love. By its very nature, it must seek God, who is love."
—Mechthild of Magdeburg, 13th century Germany

For twelve years, Daisy has been the best dog any person could love. But last week, when she disappeared into the woods? That wasn’t what I was thinking. As I tramped along the wet trail, calling for her, other words came to mind.

We’ve rambled together through these woods for years. Well, I ramble. She bounds. Even now, slowed by arthritis, something out there makes a puppy of her. So, mostly, she remains a black blur through the trees. After a while, I turn back and she meets me at the trailhead. Except last week, when, for the first time, she didn’t. I had to walk back up the trail into the woods, whistling, singing out, “Daisy! Daisy! Here girl!” Like a fool.

Which is how it is sometimes between me and God. Some know God as a thunderstorm: scary, overwhelming. Others, as a porch light: steady, soft, always on. But I like a Celtic image for the Spirit: a wild goose. Untamed, ungoverned by our words, our demands, our categories of mind. A wild goose goes where it will.

For Christians, Lent is a wilderness time. A time when it’s not clear how, or if, Love will win in the end. A time to ponder Love’s elusiveness. Its absence. I’ve known times when I’ve wandered, bereft. Maybe you have, as well. What if Love wasn’t a far porch light, toward which we had to trudge? What if it was a wild goose, a wet dog? Instead of some grim pursuit, in our desire to meet it, we’d be compelled to sing out. To invite, to entice, it.

In the end, Daisy returned, very pleased with herself. But, before? In the woods? When I thought she was gone? All I knew was my part: to sing out her name.

Prayer
Spirit of undomesticated power, beyond our full understanding, we are here: wondering, doubting, a little fearful, in need. Let us know our desire in desiring You and find our fulfillment in finding You. Let us discover how to sing Love home again, that we might be vessels of Your creative peace, set free at long last in this world. Amen.

About the Author

  • Since 2003, Jake Morrill has served as Lead Minister of the Oak Ridge Unitarian Universalist Church. He has also served as Executive Director of the UU Christian Fellowship since 2015. From 2013-16, he served as a Chaplain in the U.S. Army Reserve, and was a Trustee on the UUA...

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