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Guided Intercessory Prayer

Spirit in Practice

Workshop 2

Leader Resource 2

 

I invite you to close your eyes. Breathe in and breathe out, slowly and gently. Bring quiet to your mind—gently bring stillness to your thoughts, to that sometimes racing internal monologue. Prepare yourself to find a stillness—to hear “a still small voice” or “a voice of quiet stillness” within.

 

While in this quiet place, allow the thought of a person you know very well—someone you know and love—to come into your consciousness. Do not force it. Allow it to come on its own. This person can be living or long gone.

 

And when someone comes to mind, don’t hang on to them. Let the thought of this person quietly flow on, just as you’re letting thoughts about other things flow out on the current of your breathing.

 

Other people may come to mind. Or one may just keep coming back. Either way, do not become attached to any of the thoughts, but notice if there are any which have particular energy.

 

Eventually the thought of one person should distill out and you’ll realize that this is who you want to pray for.

 

Now ask—God, your higher power, your own inner knowing—what it is you should be praying for. You might “hear” words; you might become aware of a feeling; you might get an idea for something you should do. Whatever it is, notice it, but don’t hold on to it too tightly. Keep returning to your quiet breathing.

 

Pray that prayer. You can say “This is what I wish for you,” “This is what I pray for you,” “This is what I hope for,” or any other words that feel genuine to you. Focus on your intentions and hopes for this person, allowing yourself to feel all the emotions that come with your intentions and hopes.

 

[Allow two minutes of silence.]

 

I now invite you to repeat the same process, this time thinking of a person you don’t know well.

 

Allow the thought of a person you don’t know very well to come into your consciousness. Do not force it. Allow it to come on its own.

 

Now ask—God, your higher power, your own inner knowing—what it is you should be praying for. You might “hear” words; you might become aware of a feeling; you might get an idea for something you should do. Whatever it is, notice it, but don’t hold on to it too tightly. Keep returning to your quiet breathing.

 

Pray that prayer. You can say “This is what I wish for you,” “This is what I pray for you,” “This is what I hope for,” or any other words that feel genuine to you. Focus on your intentions and hopes for this person, allowing yourself to feel all the emotions that come with your intentions and hopes.

 

[Allow two minutes of silence.]

 

I now invite you to repeat the same process, this time thinking of a person you are in conflict with. This can be someone who is close to you or someone you know only from afar.

 

Allow the thought of a person you are in conflict with to come into your consciousness. Do not force it. Allow it to come on its own.

 

Now ask—God, your higher power, your own inner knowing—what it is you should be praying for. You might “hear” words; you might become aware of a feeling; you might get an idea for something you should do. Whatever it is, notice it, but don’t hold on to it too tightly. Keep returning to your quiet breathing.

 

Pray that prayer. You can say “This is what I wish for you,” “This is what I pray for you,” “This is what I hope for,” or any other words that feel genuine to you. Focus on your intentions and hopes for this person, allowing yourself to feel all the emotions that come with your intentions and hopes.

 

[After two minutes, sound the bell.]

 

I invite you to slowly open your eyes and return your attention to our group.

 

 

For more information contact web @ uua.org.

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Last updated on Thursday, October 27, 2011.

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