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3rd Principle (Acceptance & Spiritual Growth)

The third of Our Unitarian Universalist Principles calls us to affirm and promote "acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations."

This list includes every page on UUA.org tagged with "3rd Principle (Acceptance & Spiritual Growth)" or one of its subcategories. This page will reload after each filter selection to update the results and the remaining selections.

Braver/Wiser: A Weekly Message of Courage and Compassion

  • By Katie Romano Griffin
    May I always remember that Tango, like life, is a dance of the people. It’s meant to be shared, not practiced in isolation.
  • By Alix Klingenberg
    When we can gently hold things steady, change comes from within; that’s where the real growth happens.
  • By Monica Dobbins
    What could you accomplish this week if you knew you had a ground team wishing you well? Who are the other explorers around you, needing a word of encouragement that would mean so much coming from you?
  • By Erika A. Hewitt
    Despite being warmly welcomed over and over by the greeters, by the family sitting behind me, and by the lead pastor, I couldn’t shake that “guest” feeling.
  • By Elea Kemler
    It is deeply spiritual work to learn to treat ourselves with compassion; to learn to see ourselves, if only in moments, the same way we look at something or someone we find beautiful: a newborn baby, the ocean, a sunset.
  • By Rayla D. Mattson
    Traditions and habits can be changed or broken and that’s not always bad. It doesn’t mean we didn’t learn or like what we did in the past, it just means that we moved on to something else and that’s okay too.
  • By Rebekah Savage
    My soul nudged me from a hiding place to confess and to seek forgiveness, and only through the grace of the Great Mystery of Life unfolding around us did I receive the blessing of journeying with a beloved, grieving friend.
  • By Robin Tanner
    Advent is about expectation—radical expectations that undo the status quo—and anticipation: a skillful search for the places where liberation rises from the ashes.
  • By Misha Sanders
    I trusted the woman at the pharmacy to be capable of hearing hard truth. Bless her wounded heart with its internalized misogyny. She just wants women to love and support each other. Thank you. Me too.
  • By Yuri Yamamoto
    Who are the angry birds in my life? Do I avoid opportunities in fear of risks? What are the sticks I carry in my heart so as not to be hurt again?
  • By Amanda Poppei
    It's an impulse of the human self to be known fully, and that’s almost never possible unless we risk the conversations that help us see past our initial impressions.
  • By Robin Tanner
    This is a story of in-the-middle for those wondering how their story ends.
  • By Kat Liu
    If a friend were in my situation, I would have seen their failings as human. So why hold someone to an unforgiving standard just because that someone is me?
  • By Elea Kemler
    I choose to believe in community. I choose to believe in the difficult, slow work of building a common life.
  • By Rayla D. Mattson
    My heart broke the day my son stood in the bathroom crying. He handed me a pair of scissors and told me to just cut it . I told him how beautiful his hair was and how sad I would be to see him cut it.
  • By Lindasusan Ulrich
    Spirit of Compassion, remind us that our task as humans is not perfection, but faithfulness.
  • By Rayla D. Mattson
    My three-year-old is almost completely nonverbal. Every day when she gets off the bus, I ask her the same question: I ask her how her day...
  • By DeReau K. Farrar
    How many times do I need to make mistakes at the expense of other people, or people’s groups, before I’m ready to admit that I’m not any better at this than the bigoted and willfully ignorant? If I am to “be change,” I must commit to humility and refuse to settle for my own comforting achievements.
  • By Robin Tanner
    I long for progressive religious communities that are confessing communities—places where we admit our wrongdoings, are held accountable, and called back into covenant.
  • By Sean Parker Dennison
    I’ve been doing a lot of guest preaching lately and it’s always a little awkward. I often don’t know how the congregation is used to doing...
  • By Robin Tanner
    I had finally begun to relax—a bit. We were en route to Pennsylvania. My friend, a formal part of our “framily,” was visiting. We decided a...
  • By Erika A. Hewitt
    When I picked up her call, Kira’s voice was thick with tears. Kira, one of my best friends, is the mother of 4-year old twins, working full...
  • By Teresa Honey Youngblood
    “Did that man just strap a gun to his belt?” My 10-year-old squinted, looking across the parking lot of the grocery co-op. I had seen it,...
  • By Marisol Caballero
    I have begun to pray recently. This may sound odd coming from a minister, but as much as I adore leading prayer in front of a congregation...
  • By Teresa Honey Youngblood
    It took me 37 years to recognize that I had been cloistered off from the beauty, the richness, and the heartbreaking complexity of other people’s experiences.
  • By Robin Tanner
    "Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing, there is a field. I'll meet you there." —Rumi ...

Call and Response: Journeys in UU Lifespan Faith Development

Skinner House Books

  • Life never stops sending new spiritual challenges our way. How do we, as individuals and communities, find the path forward on crossing cultural borders, grappling with grief and loss, navigating growth and change, striving for justice and action, or questioning conscience and belief? Unafraid to...

Tapestry of Faith: Curricula and Resources for Lifespan Faith Development

Facing Death with Life

Hindsight, Humor, and Hope

Miracles

  • By Janeen K. Grohsmeyer, in her book A Lamp in Every Corner: Our Unitarian Universalist Storybook (Boston: Unitarian Universalist...
  • There once was an inquisitive, thoughtful girl named May. She was born in Belgium, about 100 years ago. She lived there only a few years...

Chalice Children