Photography, fortunately, to me has not only been a profession but also a contact between people—to understand human nature and record, if possible, the best in each individual. - Nickolas Muray

DURING TODAY'S SESSION . . .
We learned about several elements of photography, including how to frame a subject. We planned the first Family Event and reviewed all that is involved, including the need for a consent form for subjects.

EXPLORE THE TOPIC TOGETHER: TALK ABOUT . . .
Discuss with family members what makes them feel comfortable when they are being photographed. Do they have horror stories involving photo sessions? Share any memories you may have of family photo sessions.

EXTEND THE TOPIC TOGETHER: TRY . . .
Do you have a family member who is far away? Is there someone in your family who has difficulty getting around? Pictures are a wonderful way to connect. At an upcoming family event, such as a birthday party, holiday celebration, graduation, concert, or science fair, take pictures and arrange them in a simple album. Accompany each photo with a word or two describing it. Send or deliver this album to the distant or ill family member.

FAMILY DISCOVERY
Some families have many well-organized photo albums; others have boxes of pictures in a drawer or closet. If the photos are digital, those "boxes" may be on the computer. Some families have many photos; others have just a few. At dinner tonight have a conversation about your family and its pictures. Maybe you can set aside one night a week to work together on the family album.

A FAMILY RITUAL
Does your family do family portraits on an annual or regular basis? This might be the year to do one. Research photographers who shoot family portraits, or practice photographing your family as a precursor to or extra practice for your photo shoot of other church families.

For more information contact religiouseducation@uua.org.