The PBS series Eyes on the Prize, produced by Henry Hampton's production company, Blackside, Inc., gives a detailed account of the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery in the episode "Bridge to Freedom," which includes eyewitness reflections.

Books that cover the Selma march include:

  • At Canaan's Edge: America in the King Years, 1965-1968 by Taylor Branch (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2006)
  • Call to Selma: Eighteen Days of Witness by Richard D. Leonard (Boston: Skinner House, 2002), the very personal and readable journal Rev. Leonard kept in 1965 during the march
  • No Greater Love: The James Reeb Story by Duncan Howlett (New York: Harper and Row, 1966; Boston: Skinner House, 1993), a biography
  • Selma 1965: The March That Changed the South by Charles E. Fager (Boston, Beacon Press, 1974, 1985), an excellent and accessible coverage of the march and its context.

Learn about Unitarian Universalists' involvement in the Civil Rights Movement from The Arc of the Universe is Long: Unitarian Universalists: Anti-Racism and the Journey from Calgary by Leslie Takahashi Morris, Chip Roush, and Leon Spencer (Boston: Skinner House, 2009).

UU World offers an annotated time line from an article "From Selma to the Voting Rights Act of 1965," originally published in UU World magazine, May/June 2001.

Learn more about Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel's Civil Rights Era work by watching this Religion and Ethics Newsweekly episode or exploring the accompanying resources.

The United States Park Service offers a lesson plan on the Selma march and its significance in the Civil Rights Movement.

For more information contact religiouseducation@uua.org.