Main Content

I cannot tell you what I am going to do until I can tell you the story or stories that I am part of. — Alisdair McIntire, 20th-century philosopher and virtue ethicist

We need not think alike to love alike. — Francis David (c. 1510-1579), founder of the Unitarian Church of Transylvania

IN TODAY'S WORKSHOP... we considered the question, "Who is my neighbor?" both figuratively and literally. We studied the story of the Good Samaritan. We also completed a Community Asset Map, to try and identify the nonprofit organizations, religious communities, community needs, and potential partners in our community we might work with to achieve religious pluralism. Here are a few activities to continue your exploration:

  • Ask members of your family if they know the story of the flaming chalice. Tell the story as you learned it and share the story of Martha and Waitstill Sharp, "Righteous Among the Nations"
  • Visit the website of the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee. What causes might be modern-day heroes like the Sharps be working on?
  • Invite your family or friends to help you expand your Community Asset Map. Share your worksheet with them and see if they can identify any potential partners you missed.
  • Call or email someone whom you identified as a potential partner in the Community Asset Mapping activity. Describe the A Chorus of Faiths group and why you care about interfaith work. Ask if they are interested in getting involved!

Like, Share, Print, or Explore

For more information contact