The bend in the road is not the end of the road, unless you refuse to take the turn. — Anonymous

The duct tape symbolizes flexibility. This session provides opportunities for participants to reflect on the value and qualities of developing an open mind and a flexible faith. A theme of discussion is the Unitarian Universalist expectation of change and flexibility in one's understandings and beliefs. Allow time for participants to consider what it means to live with changeable answers. As leaders, you will want to emphasize the importance of being informed and flexible decision-makers.

Goals

This session will:

  • Help deepen participants' Unitarian Universalist identity, ethical discernment, and understanding of Unitarian Universalist faith through reflection and discussion
  • Teach participants that Unitarian Universalism is a faith that will grow and adapt with you as your life changes
  • Introduce the Unitarian Universalism Principle that affirms and promotes acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations
  • Demonstrate that Unitarian Universalism comes from a flexible, living tradition that has, as one Source, direct experience of that transcending mystery and wonder, affirmed in all cultures, which moves us to a renewal of the spirit and an openness to the forces which create and uphold life
  • Engage participants in the spiritual practices of chalice lighting, voicing of joys and concerns, and intentional discussion

Learning Objectives

Participants will:

  • Explore the flexibility and strength of duct tape, and learn how duct tape is a metaphor for the quality of flexibility in our faith
  • Discuss the symbolism of duct tape and the value of being flexible and open-minded in our faith
  • Imagine life without choices or flexibility in the context of hearing a story
  • Practice adapting to quickly changing circumstances by playing a game
  • Express flexibility through one or more creative art forms
  • Reflect on times they were flexible or changing and times they were rigid

For more information contact religiouseducation@uua.org.