Search Our Site

Page Navigation

Section Banner

Activity 5: Courage Pictures (18 minutes), Session Courage: Courage

In "Moral Tales," a Tapestry of Faith program

Materials for Activity

  • Crayons and/or color markers
  • Blank paper with "I See Myself as Courageous," printed on top for all participants

Preparation for Activity

  • Optional: Make several examples of drawings using stick figures, and cartoon dialogue such as, "Stop it!" or "I can do this!" in which they are facing a challenge with confidence.

Description of Activity

Have each child take a place at a work table. Put the crayons and/or markers on work tables. Distribute the paper with, "I See Myself as Courageous," to all participants.

In this hands-on art activity you are inviting the children to envision themselves using their assertiveness skills to act with courage in a situation that they care about. This could be standing up to someone who is treating others unjustly. It could be trying something new that is frightening such as traveling to a country where you don't speak the language well. The goal of this activity is for the children to think about situations in which they would like to have more courage to do what is right, and then to picture themselves doing it. It does not matter whether they produce beautiful works of art. You can emphasize this in words and by the examples of your pictures that you show the group.

As the children work on their pictures, go around and ask them individually what their picture is about one at a time, or can. If you wish you can write what they tell you the picture is about. One reason to write what the picture is about for them is that they may not finish the picture during this session and this may help their parents to talk with them about it at home.

If you have time, invite volunteers to share about the picture they have drawn.

Including All Participants

If there are children in the group who lack confidence about art activities, encourage them to use stick figure drawings. If there are children who have challenges that prevent them from being able to draw, either write down the child's ideas for them or stick figure draw their ideas for them to see and take home. There is also a great variation in writing ability at this age and some of the children will be more comfortable dictating any words they want included in their picture to you. Make it clear that children can simply draw and not worry about writing any words at all.

For more information contact web @ uua.org.

This work is made possible by the generosity of individual donors and congregations. Please consider making a donation today.

Last updated on Friday, May 25, 2012.

Sidebar Content, Page Navigation

 

Updated and Popular

Recently Updated

For Newcomers

Learn more about the Beliefs & Principles of Unitarian Universalism, or read our online magazine, UU World, for features on today's Unitarian Universalists. Visit an online UU church, or find a congregation near you.

Page Navigation