I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I can do something. And because I cannot do everything, I will not refuse to do something that I can do. — Edward Everett Hale

This session introduces the concept of responsibility. It reinforces the ideas in the seventh Unitarian Universalist Principle, respect for the interdependent web of all existence, by demonstrating the idea that our action or lack of action makes a difference in an interdependent world. It encourages the children to feel empowered to take action when love, faith and conscience call. The session is woven around a folk tale from Thailand and Burma, "Not My Problem." In this story a queen is repeatedly asked to take action on what she considers a matter too small for her attention. She continues to ignore it until the situation grows to the point that her whole kingdom is lost. During the session the children explore the concept and experience of responsibility through acknowledging ways that they already make a difference, considering through role play how to make a difference in real life scenarios, and brainstorming problems that matter to them, and how even small actions on their part promote positive change. Responsibility is added to the Moral Compass.

Goals

The session will:

  • Take pride in sharing ways that they acted with courage this week
  • Learn more about courage from hearing other children share their acts of goodness
  • Gain a greater understanding of the meaning of courage to act with conscience
  • Experience feeling more assertive and courageous
  • Identify situations in which they would like to feel more courageous
  • Strengthen connection to their faith community
  • Strengthen their sense of responsibility to the community.

Learning Objectives

Participants will:

  • Participate in an adaptation of the "Gems of Goodness" exercise focused on courage
  • Hear a story that illustrates risk taking in the face of injustice
  • Experience an assertiveness training exercise and practice using assertiveness skills
  • Share a way that they would like to be more courageous, in the closing ceremony

For more information contact religiouseducation@uua.org.