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Activity 4: Immigration Red Rover (8 minutes), Session 12: The Power of Reaching Out

In "Sing to the Power," a Tapestry of Faith program

Preparation for Activity

  • Make sure you have an open space that is safe for an active game.

Description of Activity

Participants experience feelings of being excluded and of including or protecting others that could occur related to someone's immigration to a new country, through variations on the game of Red Rover.

Ask if the children know the game Red Rover. Tell them they will play some different versions of it.

Explain that in the first version, all participants except one will create a wall by holding hands or placing their arms around each other. The one "immigrant" must try to break through the wall of people to get into their "new country." Allow each participant to experience being the "immigrant." Then lead reflection:

  • How did it feel to be the person trying to break through?
  • If you were part of the "wall," how did you feel about the person who was trying to break through?

Now introduce another version of the game. Have all but two participants lock hands or arms to create a circle. One participant—the "immigrant"—stands in the center of the circle. The second participant starts outside the circle, and must try to get through the circle of people to put their hands on the "immigrant's" shoulders. The job of the people in the circle is to protect the "immigrant" and try to prevent this from happening. You may wish to offer specific guidelines ("no kicking," "keep your hands locked where they are to form the circle") to convey that everyone's movements must keep the game safe for everyone. Change roles as many times as time allows. Then, lead reflection:

  • How did this feel different from the earlier version? What was it like to be in the middle?
  • What was it like to be the person trying to get to the "immigrant?"
  • How different did it feel to be the circle of protection rather than the wall keeping someone out?

Including All Participants

If any participants have mobility or balance challenges, have the circle of protectors sit in a circle of chairs rather than standing in a circle.

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Last updated on Monday, October 20, 2014.

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