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The fairest thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science... It was the experience of mystery, even if mixed with fear, that engendered religion. A knowledge of the existence of something we cannot penetrate, of the manifestations of the profoundest reason and the most radiant beauty—it is this knowledge and this emotion that constitute the truly religious attitude. In this sense, and in this alone, I am a deeply religious man. — Albert Einstein

Big Question: Can we ever solve life's mystery?

Here is another question which may prompt a quick "no." The session examines this seemingly obvious answer inviting youth to revisit a few Big Questions from previous sessions. A story, in the form of a drama, suggests that questioning is basic to human nature. In WCUU, youth create UU entries for a Mystery Day Parade modeled on the traditional Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. WIT Time leads them to consider the big questions most important in their own lives.

The playlet and the parade can both be done simply or with elaborate creative participant input. Read both activities carefully. Determine realistic parameters for each based on the time available and the energy of the group.


This session will:

  • Pose the Big Question "Can we ever solve life's mystery?" and explore Unitarian Universalist responses
  • Re-examine Big Questions from previous sessions
  • Present mystery as an essential part of human life
  • Show how answers generate new questions
  • Demonstrate Unitarian Universalist joy in mystery, as well as our need to explore it.

Learning Objectives

Participants will:

  • Understand mystery as natural and compelling to humans, and an experience celebrated in our faith
  • Refresh their thoughts about Big Questions previously posed
  • Hear Unitarian Universalist ideas about the nature and importance of questioning
  • Identify the Big Questions most important to their lives
  • Grow in comfort with questioning, accepting that questions sometimes produce ambiguous, contradictory answers
  • Celebrate mystery.

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