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Caregivers
Caregivers

A well-loved reading in the Unitarian Universalist hymnbook ends with the words, "All our lives we are in need, and others are in need of us." As adults grow older, some of them need care to navigate the challenges of day-to-day living. While some have professional caregivers, many rely on family members and friends for needed help. Caregiving is a gift of love and compassion to another, but it is also a privilege, giving both the caregiver and the one who receives care a chance to explore unknown territory together. Caregiving requires practical skills as well as physical, emotional, and spiritual resources.

Practical Guidance and Information

For Congregations

  • The caregiver statistics offered by the Caregiver Action Network, provide useful information for congregations who are considering growing their ministry to those who are caring for older loved ones.
  • Alzheimer's Caregiving Takes a Village, a 2014 UU World article by the Rev. Jade Angelica, offers practical suggestions for how UUs can better serve people with dementia and their loved ones.
  • Rev. Esther Hurlburt, a Unitarian Universalist community minister, offers workshops and programs about using Unitarian Universalist practices and values to help navigate the challenges of caregiving. Programs are for congregations and for older adults and their families.
  • Healing Moments, a nonprofit focused on Altzheimer's/Dementia education and Advocacy, offers workshops for faith communities about how to address the pastoral needs of individuals with Atzheimer's/Dementia and their caregivers.
  • The Sacred Care Project was developed by Bridget Betzer at the Northwest Unitarian Universalist Church, Southfield, MI, as a way to help faith communities support those at the end of life.

Spiritual Support for Caregivers

Where Two Worlds Touch:
A Spiritual Journey Through Alzheimer's Disease

Jade Angelica
From Skinner House Books
Also available as an eBook in the Amazon Kindle Store and on Google Play . A spiritual memoir and a pastoral guide for those who love someone with Alzheimer's. Offers advice on preserving connection, self-care, and staying open to the possibility of grace.

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For more information contact adultprograms@uua.org.