New address: 24 Farnsworth Street, Boston, MA 02210-1409.

Search Our Site

Page Navigation

Section Banner

A-Z Index & Glossary of Unitarian Universalist Programs, Resources & Organizations

To find individuals or congregations, try the staff search, religious leaders search, board/committee listings, or congregation search.

'' A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

U-Bar-U

U-Bar-U is a Unitarian Universalist Retreat and Conference Center located on 142 rugged acres in the storied Hill Country near Kerrville, Texas.

Unicamp

A Unitarian Universalist camp that is committed to providing a safe and welcoming seasonal camp and spiritual retreat to a diverse community.

UNIQUEST

A small Unitarian Universalist publishing venture that encourages dialogue, research and scholarship between and among differing Unitarian Universalists and liberal international religious groups; it supports the maintenance of liberal religious archives both nationally and internationally; through its publications and digital archiving, it safeguards and promotes liberal religious heritage and history.

Unirondack

A Unitarian Universalist Camp and Conference Center located in the forever wild forests of the Adirondack Mountains.

Unitarian Sunday School Society (USSS)

Provides funds for the development, testing, publication, and distribution of religious education materials that can be used by churches, fellowships, and individuals throughout the Unitarian Universalist Association.

Unitarian Universalism (UUism)

A theologically liberal religious belief system characterized by some as a "new religious movement" and by others as a Protestant denomination. Formed by the consolidation of the Unitarian and Universalist denominations in 1961, Unitarian Universalism has ties to and honors many religious practices, as discussed in the Principles and Purposes document which grounds our belief system. Congregations are self-governing with authority and responsibility vested in the membership of the congregation.

Unitarian Universalist (UU)

Unitarian Universalists draw inspiration from our faith's two historic roots. Universalism, with its roots in eighteenth century England and America, challenged its members to reach out and embrace people whom society often marginalized, guided by the belief that all were children of God. Unitarianism, which took root in America is the early nineteenth century, believed in one God and supporters were called to work for religious liberty and a rational search for truth and meaning. Both Unitarians and Universalists shared a commitment to create a more just society. Our faith's history and beliefs have a wide range: from liberal Christian views about Jesus to a rich pluralism that includes theist and atheist, agnostic and humanist, pagan, Jew, and Buddhist.

United Nations Office, Unitarian Universalist (UU-UNO)

The UU-UNO engages in the work of the UN to advance a peaceful, just, sustainable and pluralistic world community that promotes human rights, and engage and inspire Unitarian Universalists and others to support and participate in this work.

United States Congregations

Universalist Convocations

Explores and draws from the heritage of Universalist experience and faith to inform Unitarian Universalism today and help light its way toward the future.

Universalist Heritage Foundation

Celebrates the heart of the Universalist message of faith, hope and love and develops programs that will articulate and spread this Universalist message, adding strength, depth and wisdom to contemporary Unitarian Universalism.

Urban Ministry, Unitarian Universalist

Since 1826, the Unitarian Universalist Urban Ministry has worked to empower Boston’s underprivileged citizens through education and advocacy.

USSS (Unitarian Sunday School Society)

Provides funds for the development, testing, publication, and distribution of religious education materials that can be used by churches, fellowships, and individuals throughout the Unitarian Universalist Association.

UU (Unitarian Universalist)

Unitarian Universalists draw inspiration from our faith's two historic roots. Universalism, with its roots in eighteenth century England and America, challenged its members to reach out and embrace people whom society often marginalized, guided by the belief that all were children of God. Unitarianism, which took root in America is the early nineteenth century, believed in one God and supporters were called to work for religious liberty and a rational search for truth and meaning. Both Unitarians and Universalists shared a commitment to create a more just society. Our faith's history and beliefs have a wide range: from liberal Christian views about Jesus to a rich pluralism that includes theist and atheist, agnostic and humanist, pagan, Jew, and Buddhist.

UU World Magazine

UU World’s mission is to help its readers build their faith and act on it more effectively in their personal lives, their congregations, their communities, and the world.

UU're Home

UU're Home is a membership organization for Unitarian Universalists and other religious liberals that provides information about bed & breakfast accommodations in members' homes throughout North America, and a few abroad.

UU-UNO (United Nations Office, Unitarian Universalist)

The UU-UNO engages in the work of the UN to advance a peaceful, just, sustainable and pluralistic world community that promotes human rights, and engage and inspire Unitarian Universalists and others to support and participate in this work.

UUA (Association, Unitarian Universalist)

The association of all member Unitarian Universalist congregations, predominantly located in the United States. It should be noted that the work of the Unitarian Univeralist Association (UUA) staff is not the same as the work of the UUA, given that the UUA is an association of congregations.

UUADP (Death Penalty, Unitarian Universalists for Alternatives to the)

A social action group, seeking to give witness to the six Unitarian Universalist Association resolutions calling for an end to capital punishment.

UUAM (Animal Ministry, Unitarian Universalist)

A group of concerned Unitarian Universalists who desire to grow and express their faith as compassion towards all beings.

UUAWO (Washington Office for Advocacy, Unitarian Universalist)

Renamed to "Witness Ministries," we exist to represent Unitarian Universalist values in public discourse and to help congregations be more effective in their social justice work.

UUBF (Buddhist Fellowship, Unitarian Universalist)

In recent years, Unitarian Universalists (UUs) have increasingly been drawn to explore Buddhist religious practices, especially seated meditation, in order to ground the "free and responsible search for truth and meaning" that is one of the guiding principles of the UU tradition.

UUCARDS (Curriculum and Resource Developers, Unitarian Universalist)

Creating, promoting, and distributing religious education materials for Unitarian Universalists.

UUCEF (Endowment, Unitarian Universalist Common Endowment Fund)

The UUCEF is available for the investment of endowment funds, trust funds, and other assets of congregations that have a long-term investment perspective and the need for income to support their missions.

UUCF (Christian Fellowship, Unitarian Universalist)

The Unitarian Universalist (UU) Christian Fellowship is an organization of women and men, most of whom are members of a UU church, who are interested in exploring liberal Christianity within the context of their liberal religious faith.

UUCSJ (College of Social Justice, Unitarian Universalist)

The mission of the UU College of Social Justice (UUCSJ) is to increase the capacity of Unitarian Universalists to catalyze justice. UUCSJ is a formal collaboration of the Unitarian Universalist Association and the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee.

UUDPR (Drug Policy Reform, Unitarian Universalists for)

A continental coalition of Unitarian Universalists leading the denomination's efforts to develop and promote more just and compassionate drug policies, advocating that drug use should be a health issue, not a crime.

UUFP (Funding Program, Unitarian Universalist)

The mission of the Unitarian Universalist (UU) Funding Program is to promote the influence of UU principles through grantmaking. Funds generously provided by the UU Veatch Program at Shelter Rock.

UUHHS (History & Heritage Society, Unitarian Universalist)

Supports research and scholarship in various fields of historical interest and provides programs and publications for the benefit of students, scholars, and others committed to promoting and preserving our Unitarian Universalist heritage.

UUHIP (Holdeen India Program, Unitarian Universalist)

The UUHIP works with key leaders and organizations of India's most marginalized and disadvantaged peoples in their struggle to secure human rights and economic and social justice.

UUI (Infidels, Unitarian Universalist)

A group of Unitarian Universalists supporting non-religious discussion in our faith.

UUism (Unitarian Universalism)

A theologically liberal religious belief system characterized by some as a "new religious movement" and by others as a Protestant denomination. Formed by the consolidation of the Unitarian and Universalist denominations in 1961, Unitarian Universalism has ties to and honors many religious practices, as discussed in the Principles and Purposes document which grounds our belief system. Congregations are self-governing with authority and responsibility vested in the membership of the congregation.

UUJA (Jewish Awareness, Unitarian Universalists for)

Committed to supporting Unitarian Universalist Jewish multi-religiosity.

UUJEC (Just Economic Community, Unitarian Universalists for a)

A group of Unitarian Universalists working to solve poverty, homelessness, and other economic problems.

UUJME (Justice in the Middle East, Unitarian Universalists for)

Works within the Unitarian Universalist community to promote peace and justice in Israel-Palestine, including a settlement of the conflict affirming the equality, dignity, freedom and security of all peoples involved.

UUMA (Ministers Association, Unitarian Universalist)

The professional organization for Unitarian Universalist ministers, governed by its membership through an annual meeting preceding General Assembly each year.

UUMeN (Men's Network, Unitarian Universalist)

A continental membership organization for Unitarian Universalist men. Women are also welcome. Our purpose is to build a mature, liberal religious masculinity: male-positive, pro-feminist / womanist, gay-affirming, culturally and racially inclusive and diverse.

UUMFE (Earth, Unitarian Universalist Ministry for)

Connecting and inspiring an active community of Unitarian Universalists for environmental justice, spiritual renewal, and shared reverence for our Earth home.

UUMM (Military Ministry, Unitarian Universalist)

We believe that the door to religious freedom is always open and so are committed to offering Unitarian Universalist ministry to active military members.

UUMN (Musician's Network, Unitarian Universalist)

The professional organization for Unitarian Universalist (UU) musicians, whose mission is to advocate for music ministry in UU communities and support those who provide it.

UUMPS (Ministers' Partners and Spouses, Unitarian Universalist)

An informal, inclusive group that provides information and support for non-clergy partners of Unitarian Universalist ministers and ministerial students.

UUPA (Polyamory Awareness, Unitarian Universalists for)

Serves the Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) and the community of polyamorous people within and outside the UUA by providing support, promoting education, and encouraging spiritual wholeness regarding polyamory.

UUPCC (Partner Church Council, Unitarian Universalist)

For eighteen years the UUPCC has encouraged and supported congregational partnerships between American and Canadian Unitarian Universalists and Unitarians, Universalists, and Unitarian Universalists around the globe.

UUPF (Peace Fellowship, Unitarian Universalist)

The UUPF envisions a world of justice, peace and freedom.

UURISE (Refugee and Immigrant Services and Education, Inc., Unitarian Universalist)

Provides affordable, trustworthy legal immigration counseling, representation, and resettlement services to marginalized immigrants and refugees; and provides educational advocacy to the larger community.

UURMaPA (Retired Ministers and Partners Association, Unitarian Universalist)

UURMaPA gathers us at regional conferences and area lunches, where we enjoy catching up and exploring new perspectives. UURMaPA has created a Caring Network of more than forty volunteers, who stay in touch with members to celebrate life’s joys and sorrows.

UUSAN (State Advocacy Network, Unitarian Universalist)

Each of UUSAN's eleven networks is locally based, and led by Unitarian Universalists working under the basic principle that sustained, positive change is built through the work of organized activist with the courage to challenge and confront oppression.

UUSC (Service Committee, Unitarian Universalist)

An associate member organization of the Unitarian Universalist Association which works to promote and protect human rights in the United States and internationally.

UUSJ (Social Justice, Unitarian Universalists for)

A Unitarian Universalist partnership of congregations, organizations and individuals in the Baltimore Washington & Northern Virginia area deeply committed to our religious principles of human dignity, justice and compassion for all people.

UUW&R (Women & Religion, Unitarian Universalist)

Dedicated to freeing ourselves, others, and the Earth from traditional, historical, and contemporary oppressive and patriarchal systems.

UUWF (Women's Federation, Unitarian Universalist)

A circle of liberal religious women and men working to advance justice for women and girls and promote their spiritual growth.

UUWHS (Women's Heritage Society, Unitarian Universalist)

In simultaneous meetings in June 2011, the Unitarian Universalist Women’s Heritage Society and the Unitarian Universalist Historical Society voted to consolidate.

UUYAN (Young Adult Network, Unitarian Universalist)

A continental network of young adults aged eighteen to thirty-five.

For more information contact web@uua.org.

This work is made possible by the generosity of individual donors and congregations. Please consider making a donation today.

Last updated on Tuesday, December 13, 2011.

Sidebar Content, Page Navigation

 

Updated and Popular

Recently Updated

For Newcomers

Learn more about the Beliefs & Principles of Unitarian Universalism, or read our online magazine, UU World, for features on today's Unitarian Universalists. Visit an online UU church, or find a congregation near you.

Page Navigation